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Deceiving Others/deceiving Oneself: Four Cases Of Factitious Rape

Deceiving Others/Deceiving Oneself: Four Cases of Factitious Rape

M. Feldman, C. V. Ford, T. Stone

Published 1994

Medicine

Southern Medical Journal

Although patients with factitious disorders typically seek the “patient” role through illness portrayals, some instead portray themselves falsely as “victims.” We discuss the cases of four women who claimed to have been victims of rape; the allegations ultimately were disproved. Factitious rape may be prompted by a search for nurturance; by dissociation, leading individuals to believe that trauma earlier in life is ongoing; by a need to be rescued from real, current abuse; and by the projection of anger onto specific male targets. Although dramatic, factitious rape is rare, we advocate thorough investigation of rape claims even when patients have known histories of deceptive behavior.


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